A Love Stance

“Ms. J, you have a love stance!”

I was trying to help my students understand what it means to assume a particular stance as they prepare to read a particular type of text. I explained it briefly and then said,

“Ms. J has a way of seeing children that helps me decide what to do when I’m teaching you every day. If I don’t say to myself, ‘This is the kind of teacher and person I am. This is what I believe about children,’ I might not see you or the situations we find ourselves in each day the way I truly want to when things get tricky. I wonder what kind of stance I have. . .”

I imagined my students might say that I care about kindness and holding them to very high standards academically and behaviorally. And they did. But I was taken aback (I literally took a step backward) when my tiny human friend told me that love is what he sees in me as we grow together each day.

I am replete with faults. There is not a day that goes by that I don’t say to myself, “I really messed that up.” I recently read an article that said that current research indicates that elementary school teachers make an average of 1,500 decisions each day. How can I not fail at something despite my intentions to be the Mary Poppins of educators under that kind of pressure?! But I try. And my impact on this little boy’s life is clearly aligned with my intentions. Thank goodness!

***

Earlier today I was scrolling through Facebook and came across a post from a high school friend. He’d made an observation that most of the people he comes across who say that their parents spanked them and they still turned out okay are actually not okay. There were several interesting comments on his post and I decided to chime in.

(In full disclosure, I do not have any children of my own. I have been actively involved in the lives of several children of friends and family, including caring for them full-time in the absence of their parents. I have also been a teacher for more than half my life. This year is my twenty-second in the classroom.)

In my comment, I wrote about how long I had been teaching, the overwhelming number of children I had worked with (100+ when I was a high school assistant band director), and how I had never had the desire to use corporal punishment to discipline my students because those who struggle with behavior do not need violence. Children who fail to make the best choices in any context are first and foremost children, who by their very nature are in the process of learning how to navigate their way through a very complex world. What said children need most of all is relationship. They need LOVE.

It seemed easy enough to offer my two cents and move on with my day. But another teacher commented. Hours later, I cannot stop processing what she wrote. According to her, the foundational problem in education, the reason she has lost all control in her classroom, is because so many, though definitely not all, school systems and states have banned or outlawed corporal punishment.

Wait. What?! You want to hit your students? 

My heart is still somewhere on the floor of my bedroom where I was when I read her comment. That there are people who think like this teaching our most precious and vulnerable resource is unbelievable. And heartbreaking.

Children are the epitome of all that is right and good in this world, the embodiment of our dreams for ourselves and our hope for humanity. Everything that is to come is being nurtured in the wombs of their hearts and minds right now. And you want to hit them? Because YOU feel out of control?

Which ones will you hit? For what reasons will you hit them? How often will this happen? How hard will you hit them? What object will you use so that you yourself do not feel the pain you are inflicting? I have so many questions, but I have known this person since high school and suspect posing them would be fruitless. I have to expend my energy within my sphere of influence.

***

Our job is to guide children to their power, not wax nostalgic about the “good old days” when educators could abuse their power and enact violence against them. As Frederick Douglass wrote, “It is easier to build strong children than to repair broken (wo)men.” The only force in the world that builds strong children is love. Embracing love is also the only way any of us will ever feel in “control.”

Though I be but one little teacher, my love for children is fierce. I am so thankful that the students whom I am fortunate enough to have in my care find this love in me despite my imperfections. They make mistakes, too, even after they have grown beyond them. I love them still because that is what love is. . .

“All of me loves all of you. You give your all to me, I’ll give my all to you. . .”

“Ms. J, you have a love stance!”

Yes, I do, my darling. And I love you. . .

2 thoughts on “A Love Stance

  1. Yes, you do … so much to process in this post –the questions you wanted to ask are haunting. Does this teacher want to be hit when they are late, wrong, tired or in any way imperfect? I wonder if it works for that person. You always refer to your students as little humans. The word choice is so important. We all need to remember they are just that and deserve the respect and love we expect as adults. Also, love how you structured this post – great mentor text to show students how to shift time. Thank you!

    Liked by 1 person

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